Finalists for the 2016 WSA Soybean Yield Contest are Announced

Shawn P. Conley, Soybean and Wheat Extension Specialist

The Wisconsin 2016 growing season was one for the record books indeed! The National Agricultural Statistics Service projects the statewide average soybean yield in WI to be a record of 55 BPA. Similarly overall production is expected to be another record at 107 million bushels. The great yields also led to a great contest. Please join me in congratulating the below finalists.

The top two entries in each division (listed in no particular order) were:

Division 4:

  • Rick DeVoe, Monroe (planted DuPont Pioneer P31T77R)
  • Kevin Bahr, Belmont (planted Asgrow AG2535)
  • *WI Bean Team (Adam Gaspar, Steve Vosberg), Madison (planted DuPont Pioneer P28T33R)

*The WI Bean Team is ineligible for official prizes as they are grad students of Dr. Conley; however, their efforts are still unofficially recognized.

Division 3:

  • Jim Salentine, Luxemburg (planted Steyer 1401L)
  • David Wilkens, Random Lake (planted NK S20-T6 Brand)

Division 2:

  • Thad Sparby, Arkdale (planted FS HiSOY HS 19A50)
  • Irvin Osterloh, Arkdale (planted FS HiSOY HS 23L50)

Division 1:

  • Dawn Lundgren, Amery (planted Croplan R2C1400)
  • David Lundgren, Amery (planted Croplan R2C1572)

New for 2016 was the Soybean Quality Contest.  It was optional for any Soybean Yield Contest entrants.  There are no geographical divisions for the Quality Contest.  One cash award will be presented statewide to the highest protein plus oil yield per acre (measured in lbs. per acre).

The finalists for the Soybean Quality Contest are:

  • Dawn Lundgren, Amery (planted Croplan R2C1400)
  • Thad Sparby, Arkdale (planted FS HiSOY HS 19A50)

The final ranking and awards will be presented at the 2017 Corn Soy Expo to be held at the Kalahari Convention Center, Wisconsin Dells on Thursday February 2nd during the WSA/WSMB annual meeting.

The contest is sponsored by the WI Soybean Program and organized to encourage the development of new and innovative management practices and to show the importance of using sound cultural practices in WI soybean production.

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